Guy Harvey Sponsors 8th Annual NSU Shark Invitational Golf Tournament

September 27, 2012

DAVIE, FL—SEPTEMBER 27, 2012— Synonymous with several championship saltwater fishing tournaments, celebrated marine artist and conservationist Guy Harvey is lending his name to a tournament hosted by Nova Southeastern University’s defending champion men’s and women’s golf teams.

The two-day Guy Harvey NSU Shark Invitational tees off with an 18-hole round for the women and 36 holes for the men on October 8 at PGA National Resort and Spa in Palm Beach Gardens. The tournament, which concludes with an 18-hole round on October 9, features 29 men’s and women’s teams from across the United States, 13 of which were ranked in the top-25 of the 2012 preseason coaches’ poll. The more than 200 players and coaches from numerous nationally-ranked teams will receive a Guy Harvey commemorative T-shirt among other items.

Entering the eight year of hosting and always featuring championship caliber competition, the NSU sharks women’s program has posted four consecutive wins in the tournament from 2008 through 2011.  The NSU men’s program has finished second twice in 2010 and 2011.

In teaming up with the NSU Shark Invitational, the Guy Harvey brand deepens its connection to the Davie-based University. In 1999, Dr. Harvey and Nova Southeastern University’s Oceanographic Center established the Guy Harvey Research Institute. The GHRI is housed at the new Oceanographic Center unveiled at a grand opening on September 27. In addition, Dr. Harvey’s art is on display at NSU’s Don Taft University Center in the form of mural roughly the size of a football field.

“We are extremely excited to announce Guy Harvey, Inc. as our title sponsor for the 8th Annual NSU Shark Invitational intercollegiate golf tournament,” Director of Athletic Michael Mominey said.  “The natural partnership with NSU and Guy Harvey further emphasized by the branding of the “Sharks” simply takes this tournament to a new level.”

Advertisements

Excuse Me Waiter, But There’s an Endangered Species in my Bowl of Soup!

September 4, 2012

NOTE: The following editorial by Dr. Neil Hammerschlag was originally written for National Geographic’s “Ocean Views” blog. Dr. Hammerschlag is a Research Assistant Professor at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science and recipient of multiple grants from the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation.

Would you eat a bowl of soup if you knew that is was made with minced endangered species? What about if it was also packed full with neurotoxins that can cause degenerative brain disease? Still hungry?

This is the case when it comes to shark fin soup, primarily a Chinese delicacy. The soup itself has no color, taste, or smell and requires addition of chicken, beef, or pork broth to add flavor. However, the cartilage from the shark fin provides texture to the soup. So, why consume it? Because it is a cultural sign of wealth and traditionally consumed at celebratory events including weddings.

Sadly, the demand for shark fin is driving several shark populations toward extinction. Tens of millions of sharks are killed annually for their fins!  However, many shark species are late to mature, have few young and reproduce very infrequently – they are simply being removed faster than they can reproduce. For example, studies suggest that some hammerhead species in the northwest Atlantic have declined over 89% between 1986 and 2000. A new study, which carried out DNA testing on shark fin soup served in 14 U.S. cities, revealed that endangered shark species, including hammerheads, were being served up at local restaurants.

Shark meat is rarely consumed. Their tissues contain high levels of urea (as in the main substance found in urine) that helps them osmoregulate in the oceans (jargon that basically means maintaining water balance so they don’t become too dehydrated)[4]. This makes their meat, for the most part, worthless. In contrast, trading in shark fins is extremely lucrative. A single bowl of soup can cost hundreds of dollars. So, when a boat goes out to harvest shark fins, they would prefer not to waste their precious cargo space on massive shark bodies, instead keeping only their fins. So, in most parts of the world, fisherman catch the sharks, hack off their fins, and discard the rest of the shark’s body at sea, leaving them to die on the ocean floor. This act is called “finning.”

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE


BusinessInsider.com: Sharks Have Some Of The Coolest Superpowers In The Animal Kingdom

August 16, 2012

NOTE: BusinessInsider.com asked Dr. Mahmood Shivji, Director of the Guy Harvey Research Institute and world renowned shark expert, to explain why we are so intrigued with sharks. The answer – their awesome superpowers, of course!

BsuinessInsider.com: All this talk about Shark Week has us interested in these prehistoric destroyers, so we decided to see what exactly makes these killers so intriguing.

With some help from Professor Mahmood Shivji, Director of the Guy Harvey Research Institute and Save Our Seas Shark Center at Nova Southeastern University, we found out that sharks have some super abilities you would not be amiss at comparing to those of a comic book superhero.

From super speed to incredibly fast healing, the over 500 species of sharks truly deserve the fascination that we have for them.

However, Dr. Shivji points out that despite these superpowers and the perceived ferociousness of sharks, very few have attacked humans. On the contrary the fishing of sharks for their fins by humans has brought many species to the brink of extinction.

CLICK HERE to learn about the awesome superpowers of sharks!


Bonefishing Blog Weighs in on Killing Sharks for Sport

August 9, 2012

NOTE: The following editorial was published on the blog “Bonefish on the Brain“: 

I get an email from Field and Stream and the subject includes “587 Pound NY Thresher Shark.”

I like Thresher Sharks. They look kind of cool with the extra long tail. There is even a Thresher Shark Research and Conservation Project outfit.

I had a feeling I wouldn’t like what I would see, but I open the email anyway and this is what I saw…

I am not a fan of killing sharks just for the sake of killing sharks. In fact, I’m pretty firmly in the “don’t do that shit” camp. Sharks are a pretty key part of the ecosystem out there, top predators usually are, and taking them out of the system just so you can get this picture makes me a bit pissed.  Thresher sharks don’t kill people, although I did read about someone that may have been killed by the tail of one of these sharks as they were pulling it in a boat somewhere.  There was zero cause to kill the thing.

I think most fly fisherman would likely NOT have killed the beast, but the non-fly Field & Stream subscribers likely would and that is why they presented it front and center in the email. I hope more of the C&R ethic can make its way into the bait and kill crowd, but I don’t know how that will happen.

I applaud the Shark Free Marina Initiative effort for trying to get there.

These are American Bison skulls… killed for fun, driving the Bison to the brink of extinction.


An Open Letter from Guy Harvey

August 3, 2012

Fellow anglers, divers and boaters,

It has come to my attention that that there is some concern, particularly among anglers in the northeast US, about my allegiance to the sport fishing community. Please know that first and foremost I am a life-long angler who loves nothing more than spending a day on the water in pursuit of big fish. It’s my passion and my profession, and I live it practically every day of the year. I am also a dedicated conservationist – I believe that we must fish responsibly and ensure the health of fish stocks throughout the world.

In an effort to broaden the message of responsible fishing, the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation (GHOF) has supported, collaborated and partnered with many organizations over the past four years, including the Shark Free Marina Initiative (SFMI). Sharks are in serious trouble in the US and around the world. However, I am not advocating for a ban on all shark fishing. My position has always been for all anglers to take a responsible, conservation-minded approach to sharks – before you legally harvest a shark, simply consider what you are doing and why you are doing it.

The shark free/friendly concept was initiated to educate and make people aware of the severe pressures being put upon sharks populations around the globe. In the past several years, we have seen many shark tournaments – particularly in Florida – go to an all-release format, which makes for responsible fishing since most of the species of sharks caught in tournaments are traditionally not good table fare.

In contrast, the iconic mako shark is considered fair game in the northeast US, as are tunas and swordfish above federal size limits. Catch and release shark tournaments in this area with high minimum qualifying weights are well organized and have shark conservation measures at heart, as do the partial release billfish tournaments in the mid-Atlantic, which I have proudly supported for over two decades.

In addition, in the US and around the world there are areas of local abundance of species where anglers can legally harvest these species in a sustainable way, even though elsewhere in the world that species may be considered rare or overexploited. This practice is fine with me. I am all about sustainability in sport fishing and commercial fishing, as well as in spearfishing and diving. However, there are many anglers who are not concerned about sustainability and that is cause for concern.

Much of the recent criticism directed my way has stemmed from the role of the Humane Society of the US (HSUS) within the SFMI organization, and alleged ties to PETA and the PEW Environment Group (PEG). I have difficulty in accommodating the role of the HSUS in the sport fishing arena. Other than encouraging catch and release where possible, I see no reason for this organization to exert any influence in sport fishing. I have an even stronger opinion of PETA, which is just too extreme to even get my attention.

As for Pew, I am not aligned with them personally, nor have I supported them during my 20-year tenure as a board member of the IGFA. The one instance in which I worked alongside PEG was in a successful effort to prevent the archipelago of the Bahamas – which was home to the last bastion of sharks in the western Atlantic – from being scoured of sharks by impending commercial interests. The GHOF’s collaborative effort with PEG and the Bahamas National Trust worked, and it prevented the wholesale slaughter of species by people who don’t give a damn.

I also support shark interactive programs and have patronized many such programs in different countries. These interactions with otherwise shy, elusive creatures are inspiring, educational and very entertaining – all without killing a single animal. In addition, the socio-economic value of these interactive sites is immense to the host countries. Only days ago, I returned from a shoot in Isla Mujeres, Mexico where for 60 days each summer thousands of whale sharks gather to feed on plankton blooms and fish spawn. This interaction pumps millions of dollars into the Mexican economy each summer. If this phenomenon occurred in the Orient, then I am certain the harpoon boats would be racing the snorkelers to the sites every day.

Another issue I have difficulty accepting is proposed MPAs based on nothing other than whims of people who want to get rid of sport fishing. These proposed areas, which are closed to sport fishing, typically do not go through a scientific analysis to tell us all about the inventory of species or the estimated biomass from which a regulated harvest could be managed. However, specific time and area closures for certain species at certain times of year do work well. It is ludicrous to allow any harvest of any animal when it is reproducing, so closure of reef fish (snapper and grouper) spawning aggregations during their respective spawning times is a good management practice, as we have seen in the Bahamas and Cayman Islands.

There are many issues facing recreational anglers and many of us have conflicting opinions on how to apply solutions that best benefit the fisheries. Not everyone is going to agree with me on every issue. However, please don’t underestimate my dedication and commitment to the sport fishing community – along with AFTCO, I put back approximately 10 percent of all royalties generated by my art into fishery research and educational programs around the world.

I want to remind my fan base – as well as all of the naysayers – that I love fishing and I love to cook and eat the fish that I catch. I do fish responsibly – I release all billfish and undersized wahoo, tuna or dolphin that I catch. But, a nice bull dolphin, yellowfin or blackfin is going in the cooler! Swordfish are also fair game – in the tournaments we have in Cayman the small ones are released and the big ones are taken. In fact, we just landed a 600 pound plus swordfish on July 22 in Mexico. Not a scrap was wasted!

Tight lines and good luck.

Guy Harvey PhD.


Massive Mako Surprises Diver and Blue Marlin During Guy Harvey Expedition in the Bahamas

July 18, 2012

You never know who will show up on a Guy Harvey Expedition! In this video, a massive 10 ft. long, 600 lb. mako breaks the underwater silence when it rockets past the camera as it stalks a blue marlin!


The Raw Power of the Oceanic White Tip Shark

July 9, 2012

While on a joint Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation/Guy Harvey Research Institute Expedition off Cat Island in the Bahamas, Guy Harvey and friends filmed the aftermath of an encounter between a hooked marlin and hungry oceanic white tip sharks. Watch this clip to see why sharks are at the top of the aquatic food chain, then use the discount code “Emma” to save $5 off the purchase of the award-winning film, “This is Your Ocean: Sharks”.