Join the Guy Harvey Hammerhead Nation!

November 14, 2012

JOIN THE HAMMERHEAD NATION!

“Hammerheads” are the legions of Guy Harvey fans who have fully adopted the Guy Harvey lifestyle. Hammerheads share Guy’s passion for angling, diving, boating and travel – a life full of adventure and exploration balanced by a keen interest in conserving the marine environment.

Are you ready to become a full-fledged member of the Hammerhead Nation? If so, just fill out this form and you’re in! After joining, you will receive these benefits:

* Monthly e-newsletter full of exclusive content

* Special offers & discounts from Guy Harvey licensees and partners

* Contests & giveaways

* Sneak previews of new merchandise and special edition gear

* Special access to Guy Harvey at public signings

No membership fees, no commitments!  Just fill out the form and you are officially a Guy Harvey Hammerhead!


New Tagging Research Reveals Remarkable Mako Shark Round-Trip Journey in High Resolution

October 30, 2012

DAVIE, FL— OCTOBER 29, 2012— A satellite reporting tagging device known as a SPOT tag, attached to a shortfin mako shark dubbed “Carol” in New Zealand five months ago, is providing scientists with remarkable and previously unknown details of the timing and long-distance migratory movements of this species.

The Guy Harvey Research Institute (GHRI) at Nova Southeastern University is collaborating with the New Zealand National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) on the tagging experiment with Carol the shortfin mako shark.

The SPOT tag is revealing that Carol is spending a lot of time at the ocean’s surface, reporting her location to the satellite several times daily.

“The unexpectedly frequent daily detections are providing us with a really high resolution view of the migration of this animal,” said GHRI Director Dr. Mahmood Shivji. “We’ve found that Carol has traveled over 5,700 miles in five months, averaging 60 miles per day during some parts of her migration—and this is just a juvenile shark!”

CLICK HERE to see an interactive map of Carol’s travels.

“Conventional identification tags tell us little about the timing of mako shark movements, the route that they take or distance traveled,” said Dr. Malcolm Francis, who is leading the NIWA effort on this study.  “The SPOT tag, revealing Carol’s detailed travels from New Zealand to Fiji and back, shows theses sharks have an amazing internal navigation system that keeps them on course over long journeys.”

Given the high fishing pressure on makos for their fins and meat, this species is showing declining population trends in parts of its range, which has resulted in the species being listed as “Vulnerable” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.

Based on the amazing results from this initial trial, the GHRI and NIWA are expanding their mako migration study off New Zealand starting in January 2013, according to Dr. Shivji.  The GHRI and Dr. Guy Harvey are also working with Captain Anthony Mendillo of Keen M International to compare the migratory patterns of mako sharks in the Atlantic by tagging them off the coast of Isla Mujeres, Mexico.


Guy Harvey Film, Research Inspires North Vancouver Mayor to Support Shark Fin Ban

October 15, 2012

NOTE: The following article appears courtesy of Huffington Post Canada.

A wave of bylaws banning the possession, trade, sale and distribution of shark fin products has swept across the province of British Columbia this past month. North Vancouver joined Port Moody and Coquitlam in introducing a ban on shark fin soup in restaurants, a popular Asian dish that supports a vast industry that is decimating shark populations worldwide and threatens many species with extinction.

Interestingly, Artists for Conservation played an important role in this policy change. Last year the mayor of the city of North Vancouver, Darrell Mussatto, attended the first annual Artists for Conservation Festival on Grouse Mountain. It was there where he first met legendary marine artist Dr. Guy Harvey, a leading advocate for the shark-fin ban, and founder of the Guy Harvey Research Institute (GHRI).

Dr. Harvey’s documentary “This is Your Ocean: Sharks” premiered at the festival last November and Mayor Mussatto had the opportunity to speak to Dr. Harvey about his efforts to save sharks from extinction through his film. That encounter inspired him to support a shark fin ban in his city last month.

Read the Full Article


Excuse Me Waiter, But There’s an Endangered Species in my Bowl of Soup!

September 4, 2012

NOTE: The following editorial by Dr. Neil Hammerschlag was originally written for National Geographic’s “Ocean Views” blog. Dr. Hammerschlag is a Research Assistant Professor at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine & Atmospheric Science and recipient of multiple grants from the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation.

Would you eat a bowl of soup if you knew that is was made with minced endangered species? What about if it was also packed full with neurotoxins that can cause degenerative brain disease? Still hungry?

This is the case when it comes to shark fin soup, primarily a Chinese delicacy. The soup itself has no color, taste, or smell and requires addition of chicken, beef, or pork broth to add flavor. However, the cartilage from the shark fin provides texture to the soup. So, why consume it? Because it is a cultural sign of wealth and traditionally consumed at celebratory events including weddings.

Sadly, the demand for shark fin is driving several shark populations toward extinction. Tens of millions of sharks are killed annually for their fins!  However, many shark species are late to mature, have few young and reproduce very infrequently – they are simply being removed faster than they can reproduce. For example, studies suggest that some hammerhead species in the northwest Atlantic have declined over 89% between 1986 and 2000. A new study, which carried out DNA testing on shark fin soup served in 14 U.S. cities, revealed that endangered shark species, including hammerheads, were being served up at local restaurants.

Shark meat is rarely consumed. Their tissues contain high levels of urea (as in the main substance found in urine) that helps them osmoregulate in the oceans (jargon that basically means maintaining water balance so they don’t become too dehydrated)[4]. This makes their meat, for the most part, worthless. In contrast, trading in shark fins is extremely lucrative. A single bowl of soup can cost hundreds of dollars. So, when a boat goes out to harvest shark fins, they would prefer not to waste their precious cargo space on massive shark bodies, instead keeping only their fins. So, in most parts of the world, fisherman catch the sharks, hack off their fins, and discard the rest of the shark’s body at sea, leaving them to die on the ocean floor. This act is called “finning.”

CLICK HERE TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE


BusinessInsider.com: Sharks Have Some Of The Coolest Superpowers In The Animal Kingdom

August 16, 2012

NOTE: BusinessInsider.com asked Dr. Mahmood Shivji, Director of the Guy Harvey Research Institute and world renowned shark expert, to explain why we are so intrigued with sharks. The answer – their awesome superpowers, of course!

BsuinessInsider.com: All this talk about Shark Week has us interested in these prehistoric destroyers, so we decided to see what exactly makes these killers so intriguing.

With some help from Professor Mahmood Shivji, Director of the Guy Harvey Research Institute and Save Our Seas Shark Center at Nova Southeastern University, we found out that sharks have some super abilities you would not be amiss at comparing to those of a comic book superhero.

From super speed to incredibly fast healing, the over 500 species of sharks truly deserve the fascination that we have for them.

However, Dr. Shivji points out that despite these superpowers and the perceived ferociousness of sharks, very few have attacked humans. On the contrary the fishing of sharks for their fins by humans has brought many species to the brink of extinction.

CLICK HERE to learn about the awesome superpowers of sharks!


Bonefishing Blog Weighs in on Killing Sharks for Sport

August 9, 2012

NOTE: The following editorial was published on the blog “Bonefish on the Brain“: 

I get an email from Field and Stream and the subject includes “587 Pound NY Thresher Shark.”

I like Thresher Sharks. They look kind of cool with the extra long tail. There is even a Thresher Shark Research and Conservation Project outfit.

I had a feeling I wouldn’t like what I would see, but I open the email anyway and this is what I saw…

I am not a fan of killing sharks just for the sake of killing sharks. In fact, I’m pretty firmly in the “don’t do that shit” camp. Sharks are a pretty key part of the ecosystem out there, top predators usually are, and taking them out of the system just so you can get this picture makes me a bit pissed.  Thresher sharks don’t kill people, although I did read about someone that may have been killed by the tail of one of these sharks as they were pulling it in a boat somewhere.  There was zero cause to kill the thing.

I think most fly fisherman would likely NOT have killed the beast, but the non-fly Field & Stream subscribers likely would and that is why they presented it front and center in the email. I hope more of the C&R ethic can make its way into the bait and kill crowd, but I don’t know how that will happen.

I applaud the Shark Free Marina Initiative effort for trying to get there.

These are American Bison skulls… killed for fun, driving the Bison to the brink of extinction.


Massive Mako Surprises Diver and Blue Marlin During Guy Harvey Expedition in the Bahamas

July 18, 2012

You never know who will show up on a Guy Harvey Expedition! In this video, a massive 10 ft. long, 600 lb. mako breaks the underwater silence when it rockets past the camera as it stalks a blue marlin!


The Raw Power of the Oceanic White Tip Shark

July 9, 2012

While on a joint Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation/Guy Harvey Research Institute Expedition off Cat Island in the Bahamas, Guy Harvey and friends filmed the aftermath of an encounter between a hooked marlin and hungry oceanic white tip sharks. Watch this clip to see why sharks are at the top of the aquatic food chain, then use the discount code “Emma” to save $5 off the purchase of the award-winning film, “This is Your Ocean: Sharks”.


This Film Will Change the Way You Look at Sharks – Forever!

July 7, 2012

“This is Your Ocean – Sharks”, the award-winning and internationally-acclaimed shark documentary starring Guy Harvey, Wyland and Jim Abernethy, is now available for purchase for the first time. Order the film here, and enter coupon code “Emma” for $5 off the purchase price.


China Bans Shark Fin Soup from Official Banquets

July 3, 2012

Big news from Ground Zero in the battle over shark fin soup and the international shark fin trade! Chinese media is reporting that the Chinese government has banned shark fin soup from being served at all official government banquets. The ban will not be immediate, but the move is a huge victory nonetheless for the anti-shark finning movement. Here’s the full story from CNN.com:

Hong Kong (CNN) — China is planning to ban shark fin soup from being served at official banquets, in a sign the country may be losing its taste for the expensive delicacy.

According to Chinese media, the Government Office Administration of the State Council said the ban could take up to three years to implement and would help cut the cost of sometimes lavish banquets held for state functions.

The move followed a proposal made during the National People’s Congress in March this year.

Bertha Lo of the campaign group Hong Kong Shark Foundation said the move could potentially reduce the amount of sharks killed given that China is the biggest consumer of shark fin products.

“I think it will have an impact,” she said. “The government in China is powerful and if it takes the lead on this issue, I don’t see why others shouldn’t follow suit.”

Between 26 million and 73 million sharks are estimated to be killed each year, according to a 2006 academic study* quoted on the website of Lo’s group. Their carcasses are usually discarded and campaigners say the practice is wasteful and cruel.

The World Wildlife Fund says that 181 species of shark are under threat, up from 15 in 1996.

Shark’s fin soup is widely served in restaurants in Chinese communities worldwide and is a dish often served at weddings to mark the importance of the occasion and impress the couple’s extended families and friends.

But the custom has become less popular among a younger generation of diners, who are more environmentally conscious, says Lo.

Last year, the operator of the high-end Peninsula hotel chain said it would remove shark fin products from its menus and Shangri-la Hotels made a similar move this year.

In Beijing, the five-star Swissotel has also stopped serving shark fin, according to the China Daily.

Outside Asia, legislation banning shark fin has been introduced in five U.S. states including California, which this month also banned the French duck liver delicacy foie gras on the grounds of cruelty.

In China, the campaign against shark fin products has gained steam following pledges by celebrities, such as former NBA star Yao Ming, not to eat the delicacy.

* The academic study cited in this article was conducted by the Guy Harvey Research Institute and Dr. Shelley Clarke.