Guy Harvey Outpost Sponsors Auditorium at Florida Gulf Coast Center for Fishing

September 28, 2012

The newly rebranded Guy Harvey Outpost, a TradeWinds Beach Resort has jumped right in to supporting conservation efforts on the Gulf Coast by becoming title sponsor of Florida Gulf Coast Center for Fishing & Interactive Museum’s auditorium, now named Guy Harvey Outpost Auditorium presented by TradeWinds Island Resorts The 2,000 square foot, state-of-the-art auditorium features a 100-seat amphitheater with full audio and visual presentation capability. The auditorium will feature film presentations for children and adults, including the Guy Harvey video series, educational classes, seminars and community events. The auditorium sponsorship is contracted through 2017.

The Florida Gulf Coast Center for Fishing & Interactive Museum is an educational complex complete with auditorium, classrooms, historical and marine art galleries, interactive fishing simulator area, marine store and outdoor fishing lake – aligning perfectly with Guy Harvey’s signature brand of preserving marine resources through education in science and hands-on exploration.

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Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Symposium Underway in St. Pete Beach, FL – Day 1 Recap

September 14, 2012

A very productive and enlightening Day 1 at the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Symposium is coming to a close. Antonio Fins, Executive Director of the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation, filed the following synopsis of today’s conversation:

A score of researchers and stakeholders in the Gulf of Mexico’s environment wrestled with the challenges from the 2010 Deepwater Horizons disaster.

The spill — rather, the blowout — from two years ago isn’t the only challenge facing the massive body of water.

For starters, hypoxia — low oxygen levels — impact size able areas. And demands for fish and Gulf seafood puts pressure on stocks even without the oil blowout that unleashed 20 times more oil into the Gulf than what the Exxon Valdez dumped in Alaska waters.

What to do?

The answer: stakeholders need to stop battling each other. Instead they need to back technology, better fishing practices and precise data on species to meet America’s and the world’s need for Gulf fish an seafood in the next 25 years.

One area to improve is aquaculture — the harvesting of fish and seafood in environmentally sensitive and sustainable ways.


Guy Harvey Talks Fisheries Symposium & Guy Harvey Outpost Grand Opening with Fishing Florida Radio

September 10, 2012

Guy recently spoke with BooDreaux, Steve and Capt. Mike of Fishing Florida Radio to discuss the upcoming Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Symposium, which is being held this week in conjunction with the Grand Opening of the new Guy Harvey Outpost on St. Pete Beach. Click here to listen to the interview.

 


Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation Donates $50,000 To Florida Youth Conservation Centers

September 6, 2012

Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation check presentation (left-to-right) FWC Commissioner Charles Roberts; FWC Commissioner Aliese Priddy; FWC Commissioner Richard Corbett,  Antonio Fins, Executive Director of Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation; Steve Stock, President of Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation and Guy Harvey, Inc; FWC Chairman Kenneth Wright;  FWC Vice-Chairman Kathy Barco; FWC Commissioner Brian Yablonski; FWC Commissioner Ronald Bergeron; WFF Exec. Dir. Brett Boston

TAMPA, FL—SEPTEMBER 6, 2012— The Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation today furthered its commitment to marine education efforts in the Sunshine State with a $50,000 donation to the Florida Youth Conservation Centers Network (FYCNN).

The FYCCN is a non-profit partnership between the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission and the Wildlife Foundation of Florida. Working with 85 partner organizations, FYCNN has served more than 120,000 Florida youths in the past three fiscal years by connecting them with traditional outdoor activities. The Guy Harvey organization’s donation will provide seed funding to establish 10 permanent summer camps for youths to introduce them to saltwater environment education, saltwater fishing, kayaking and other conservation-related activities.

Steve Stock, president of the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation and Guy Harvey, Inc., said the FYCNN was made possible by monies raised this year through a partnership with the Florida Lottery. Guy Harvey’s artwork and merchandise, including apparel, have long been among the most recognizable and popular brand. In March of this year, The Florida Lottery launched the GUY HARVEY® Scratch-Off game, featuring a series of six colorful wildlife illustrations. The game distributed 12 million $2 tickets in just five months, making it one of the most successful scratch-off games in the 25-year history of the Florida Lottery.

The Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation and Guy Harvey, Inc., are committed to investing lottery game proceeds in marine conservation and education programs across Florida. The funding of the FYCCN is a major step toward achieving that goal.

“By supporting these youth conservation centers we are directly meeting our mission objectives to fund both inspired scientific research and innovative education programs to encourage conservation and best management practices for sustainable marine environments,” said Dr. Harvey.  “Helping our children develop a conservation ethic through a strong personal connection with nature is essential for   the future of the state’s natural resources.”


Guy Harvey Film Festival Coming to St. Pete Beach

September 5, 2012

Film Festival Part of Gulf Fisheries Symposium

ST. PETE BEACH, FL August 31, 2012—Legendary fisherman, artist and conservationist, Dr. Guy Harvey, will host a film festival at the Tradewinds Island Grand Resort on Saturday, September 15, 2012, in conjunction with the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Symposium. Two of Harvey’s award-winning documentaries will be featured along with trailers for his upcoming films. Admission is free but parking is limited and will cost $5 per car. The first film with be shown at 7:00 p.m. with the second showing immediately following an intermission.

In 2011, Harvey’s documentary, This is Your Ocean: Sharks, won the Macgillivray Freeman Conservation Award at the Newport Beach Film Festival in California. It will open the Saturday night event. Also on tap for viewers will be Harvey’s latest film, Mystery of the Grouper Moon, which was filmed last year in the Cayman Islands.

“Grouper Moon is a very important project for us because it shows how science and art can work in concert to bring about responsible marine conservation,” Harvey said.

Mystery of the Grouper Moon focuses on a reef in Little Cayman where thousands of Nassau grouper congregate each February during the full moon. The grouper, which come to the same reef from miles around, are there for their annual spawning. Conservationists in Cayman persuaded the government to close fishing on the reef during the spawning season to protect the fish when they are vulnerable to mass catches by local fishermen.

“I have a lifelong love affair with fishing,” Harvey said, “and this film illustrates why there are certain times when we need to protect the species in order to have healthy and sustainable populations.”

This is Your Ocean: Sharks is a bit of a love affair as well between a man and a shark. The star of the film is Emma, a 12-foot tiger shark that has been befriended by famed scuba diver, Jim Abernethy. Conventional wisdom has been that tiger sharks are ruthless man eaters and historically they have been one of the most feared sharks. However, Abernethy and Emma formed a bond during hundreds of dives and they sometimes bump nose to dive mask in a heart-stopping show of affection. Abernethy likens Emma to a “puppy dog” and the film reveals how shark and man can peacefully co-exist.

The TradeWinds Island Grand is a 20-acre resort located on the unspoiled white sand beaches of Florida’s Gulf of Mexico, with extensive meeting space, five pools, fine and casual dining, beach bars and nearly limitless recreation for both adults and children.


Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Symposium Announced for September 14-15 in St. Pete Beach, FL

August 21, 2012

Health of Gulf Seafood, Fishery Analysis and Habitat Restoration on Agenda

ST. PETE BEACH, FL—AUGUST 20, 2012— Two years after the catastrophic Deepwater Horizon oil well was finally capped, the largest gathering of scientists, fishery experts and government officials are gathering in St. Pete Beach to share the findings of their research, and to offer direction for further study.

The Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Symposium, on Sept. 14-15, is the first summit to bring together the various stakeholders in the Gulf’s fishery, an annual multi-billion-dollar industry for Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas.

The oil gusher and the clear environmental damage in 2010 captivated international attention and raised doubts about the safety of eating Gulf of Mexico seafood. It also raised concerns about short- and long-term damage to fish stocks.  Research to be presented at the symposium will begin to definitively address these issues.

The symposium will also present the results of research funded by the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation‘s 2010 “Save Our Gulf” campaign, which raised $500,000 to fund gulf fisheries research related to the oil spill. It will bring together representatives from all sectors of the marine world – recreational and commercial fishermen, non-governmental and governmental agencies, politicians, fishing authorities and marine scientists – to explore vital issues facing the Gulf through presentations and panel discussions. More than 200 are expected to attend and participate.

The recommendations offered by the Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Symposium will also involve requesting funding from the $20 billion trust established by BP to respond to claims from individuals, businesses and government entities.

Headliners appearing at the symposium are Dr. Bill Hogarth, director of the Florida Institute of Oceanography and a former Assistant Administrator for Fisheries at NOAA, and Dr. Guy Harvey, celebrated artist, fisheries scientist and conservationist. The symposium’s line-up includes Eric Schwaab, Acting Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Management, Gil McRae, Director, Fish and Wildlife Research Institute (FWRI), Donald Kent, President of the Hubbs-Seaworld Institute, Dr. Bob Hueter from Mote Marine Laboratory, Dr. Mahmood Shivji, Director of the Guy Harvey Research Institute at Nova Southeastern University.

The ultimate mission of the symposium is to provide a platform where all stakeholder groups can share knowledge and move forward with a unified mission of a sustainable and healthy fishery in the Gulf of Mexico.

For a final agenda and listing of speakers and panelists, please go to www.gulffisheriessymposium.com.

The symposium will be held at the TradeWinds Islands Resort on St. Pete Beach.  The Gulf of Mexico Fisheries Symposium is sponsored by NOAA, the Florida Fish and Wildlife Commission, the University of South Florida, the Florida Institute of Oceanography, Mote Marine Laboratory, the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation and Guy Harvey Magazine.


FWC Decides Not to Reopen September 1st Snook Season on Florida’s West Coast

June 29, 2012

Catch & release still permitted during closure

NOTE: This story was posted today on TampabayOnline.com by Special Correspondent Frank Sergeant

The Florida Fish & Wildlife Commission ruled this week that the snook fishing season will remain closed on the state’s west coast, rather than reopening Sept. 1 as scheduled.

The season has been closed due to a 2010 cold-kill, which wiped out tens of thousands of fish from Clearwater to Naples.

“This is a wise move,” said snook guide Scott Moore of Holmes Beach. “I’m seeing big fish and a few slot (keeper-sized) fish, but no little fish — we’re missing whole-year classes due to the winter kill, and we need to get more in the pipeline before we start taking them again.”

The continued closure also was supported by the Coastal Conservation Association, which said that the number of adult snook on the west coast was down 20 percent after the freeze, and the numbers of juvenile fish killed was probably much greater.

The season will reopen Sept. 1, 2013, if the commission takes no further action.

Catch-and-release fishing for snook is permitted during the closure.